ArtsNOLA
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Our Programming

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ArtsNOLA 2018 Programming

A Sample of our school-based cultural modules include the following, or you can custom design your own! All modules are offered as full-semester courses, one-week crash courses, or pop-ups.

ArtsNOLA offers two primary options: Classroom-Based Modules and Pop-Up Performances. Our modules offer young people via series of classroom-based modules that introduce students to engagement opportunities with cultural ambassadors and practitioners, cultural insight, history, cultural practices, hands-on activities, interview skills, inquiry-based learning, digital storytelling, photography, storytelling, and more. To engage young people experientially, ArtsNOLA provides a series of Pop-Up Cultural Performances that can take place either within the school or outside. Through a generous collaboration with St. Martin’s Episcopal School, we can actually bring cultural communities to students via their state-of-the-art StM Mobile Idea Lab, which can serve as either a mobile classroom for STEAM activities or a stage for cultural performances.




 
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Kickin' Some Brass

Since the 1830s, brass bands of various forms have performed and marched on the streets of New Orleans. Throughout the decades the music the bands perform have changed with the times, but the core identity of brass bands have remained intact. Today, brass bands continue to influence the identity of the city

In this module, students focus on the history of the city and brass bands and how the two influenced one another. Curriculum includes the study of and focus on traditional and contemporary brass bands, their history, origin and longevity, cultural performance, and performative engagement.
*At schools with music programs, students will form their own brass band!

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Feet Don't Fail Me Now

Benevolent Societies, also known as mutual aid organizations, were organizations created in the late 1700’s to help free and enslaved Africans cope with financial hardships such as illness and providing proper burials for family members. This important tradition remains vibrant today. For example, the Young Men of Olympia Social Aid and Benevolent Society celebrated 133 years in 2017.

In this module, students study the Benevolent Societies and Social Aid and Pleasure Clubs, their history, social-cultural importance, how social issues throughout American history have influenced their purpose and practices, their attire design and crafting, and their cultural performance and performative engagement. Student will also learn how to 2nd Line and how to make sashes.
* The overall objective is for each participating school to have their own Social Aid and Pleasure Club organization!

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Indians Jumping on Fire

They are one of the most vibrant and identifiable representations of New Orleans culture. The Mardi Gras Indians are a fascinating subculture of New Orleans. They are hierarchical, territorial tribes in African-American communities who give themselves names like Wild Magnolias, Creole Wild West and Fi Yi Yi. The tribes celebrate their unique traditions that date back to the 1800s.

In this module, students study the Mardi Gras Indians, their history, social-cultural importance, how social issues throughout American history have influenced their purpose and practices, their attire design and crafting, and their cultural performance and performative engagement. Students will learn the meanings of Mardi Gras Indian chants, masking, and beadwork crafting.
* Each participating student will learn beading techniques and make their own Mardi Gras Indians patches!

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Skeletons and baby dolls

The Baby Dolls, otherwise known as upstanding mommas and aunties gone gallivanting, extend a tradition from the rough days of Storyville. They would parade through the streets singing bawdy lyrics to vaudeville show tunes and Creole songs, playing tambourines and cowbells. Similarly, the Skeletons (Skull and Bone gangs), including the North Side Skull and Bones Gang, with their outsized skull heads and skintight black-and-white skeleton outfits, roamed the 6th and 7th Ward neighborhood as a wake-up call on Mardi Gras morning.

In this module, students study the Skeletons and Baby Doll tradition, their history, social-cultural importance, how social issues throughout American history have influenced their purpose and practices, their attire design and crafting, and their cultural performance and performative engagement.
* Each participating student will learn crafting techniques and make either their own Skeleton or Baby Doll outfit! 

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Capturing Culture

Just imagine, young children equipped with the skills and cultural knowledge – young anthropologists. This is the objective for Capturing Culture. Through media arts, ethnography, qualitative research methods, and the use of digital tools, students learn to conduct interviews to capture cultural narratives and social-cultural research that help provide historical and new cultural insights.

In this module, students develop the skills to become digital storytellers, mobile photojournalists, and creative content developers. With the power to interview community ambassadors, shoot video, take photos, conduct audio interviews, and edit, produce, and broadcast using phones and tablets, students will be able to capture intimate and compelling stories about their city. Students will learn how to use photos, video, and images to tell important stories and provide immersive experiences that educate and engage the viewer.
* ArtsNOLA provides all the necessary equipment except computers! 

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Uptown Music theatre

Delfeayo Marsalis’ Uptown Music Theatre reigns as five time national champions of the iTheatrics Festival! Uptown Music Theatre aims to expose children and adults to meaningful stories through an entertaining medium. Didactic in nature, our musicals teach young people about finding common ground and achieving peaceful resolutions. The story lines draw inspiration from folklore, history, literature, and the distinctive landmarks and cultural traditions of New Orleans. Using the ancient art of storytelling, we create shows that address modern concerns and give voices to all community members.

Available as After-School, Saturday, and Summer programming

Cultural Pop-Up Performance

ArtsNOLA’s Pop-Up’s are one time educational performances that bring culturally rich performances and cultural engagement to students. The Pop-Up’s can be hosted either at the school (if space permits) or, thanks to our amazing partnership with St. Martin Episcopal and their St. Martin’s Innovation + Design Mobile Idea Lab, which is a state-of-the-art mobile makerspace. Yes, even music-making has a performance stage on this vehicle. We’re jazzing up New Orleans through education… Let’s us bring New Orleans culture to your students!

 
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BUKU STORYTELLING

What had happened was… Storytelling predates writing. Storytelling describes the social and cultural activity of sharing stories, sometimes with improvisation, theatrics, or embellishment. Every culture has its own stories or narratives, which are shared as a means of entertainment, education, cultural preservation or instilling moral values. Because humans construct their lives and shape their world into homes in terms of these groundings and memories, storytelling is a means for sharing and interpreting experiences. For young people, learning the power of storytelling allows them to not only better understand their own life and cultural experiences, but to also become creative writers and readers who can express themselves in new and unique ways.

This interactive module is great as a classroom-based initiative in tangent with history, social studies, ELA, math, and/or geography courses or as a standalone after-school initiative. ArtsNOLA can arrange a wide-range of guest speakers who can engage a wide range of topics. For older students, Dr. Miller uses storytelling to help students cope with peer pressure, social justice and diversity issues, life skills development and more. We can also arrange a community storytelling Pop-Up.

 

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folk sign making

This module introduces students to folk art through interactive discussion-based, internet tours of American folk art, followed by hands-on art-making activities inspired by their everyday geographies. IN the tradition of Black American folk art that originated in the rural south, students will use scrap wood and varies found objects to create their one-of-a-kind folk signs. The signs are great to decorate classrooms and hallways of the school, outdoor cultural identities, and products students can sell. 

This interactive module is a hands-on craft-making activity, great as a classroom-based initiative in tangent with history, social studies, and/or geography courses or as a standalone after-school initiative. Students will learn about and discuss various facets of southern folk art and history during the process of art-making.

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2ndLine UMBRELLA and HANDKERCHIEF MAKING

The tradition for the second line handkerchief originated from the famous New Orleans jazz funerals.  Many involved in the second line would either have an umbrella or parasol to add to the spirit of the precession.  Those who did not have the umbrellas and wanted to join in the festivities would grab the nearest white handkerchief to wave in the air. The true origin of the second line umbrella was never really documented, but practicality tells us walking through the streets of the city in the scorching heat gave reason to have an umbrella, and of course, nobody wants to look like the person next to them!

This interactive module is a hands-on craft-making activity, great as a classroom-based initiative in tangent with history, social studies, and/or geography courses or as a standalone after-school initiative. Students will learn about and discuss various facets of southern folk art and New Orleans cultural history during the process of art-making.